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Speed is Everything — First Step to Faster a WordPress Site

If your website doesn’t load fast, you’re kissing your visitors goodbye before they even get to you.

Let’s face it, we’re all impatient when it comes to web page load time.  We’ve become accustomed to the internet being fast, and when we go to our local search engine, click on a link, and come across a website that doesn’t load in under 3 seconds, we’re very much inclined to hit the “Back” button and try out the next result in the search results page.

Because we’re all about not wasting a second, because life is too precious to waste on a slow loading site… even if it has better content, or a better product or service.

This is why you should do EVERYthing you can to speed up your website.  But, when your website is running WordPress, it is prone to running slower.  You’ve probably noticed that your site may not load as fast as other “static” websites.

Why is that?

There’s A Lot Going On

Well, there’s the WordPress engine core which has, at last count, over 484,000 lines of code in it.  When you throw a theme on top, there’s bound to be another 10,000 more lines of code for the theme framework.  Then there’s all the plugins that enhance the WordPress system that you install over top of the core and theme.

Before you know it, you’ve got a fantastically feature rich and robust site… that is slower than molasses.

And when I say slow, I mean slow to generate the HTML that gets sent to the browser.  I’m not even talking about optimizing for Google PageSpeed, which is a whole other topic.

What I’m talking about is just the time it takes to compile and render the HTML code that the browser uses to render the web page.

And with all of the code and database access that it takes to build the HTML, it can take a few seconds before the page is sent to the requesting web browser.

So how on earth can we speed this up?

Glad you asked.

Speed It Up

The very first thing you should do is install a “caching” plugin.

A caching plugin basically stores a static version of your Page and Posts so that there is virtually no build time — it just requests the “saved” copy of the page and serves that to the end user.  And as many pages and posts don’t get updated ‘often’, you can store a cached copy of your pages and posts until your content is updated.

If you don’t have a WordPress plugin that caches your content, you absolutely MUST get one.

If you need some place to start, we would recommend you look at either WP Total Cache or WP Super Cache.  Both have their own set of features that you can configure, and we’ll let you decide which one works best for your situation.

But you need to have one or the other.

It could mean the difference between keeping and losing those precious visitors that need your product, service, or content.